Data Archiving Platforms: Figshare

by Brianna Marshall, Digital Curation Coordinator

This is part three of a three-part series where I explore platforms for archiving and sharing your data. Read the first post in the series, focused on UW’s institutional repository, MINDS@UW or read the second post, focused on data repository Dryad.

To help you better understand your options, here are the areas I will address for each platform:

  • Background information on who can use it and what type of content is appropriate.
  • Options for sharing and access
  • Archiving and preservation benefits the platform offers
  • Whether the platform complies with the forthcoming OSTP mandate

figshare

About

figshare is a discipline-neutral platform for sharing research in many formats, including figures, datasets, media, papers, posters, presentations and filesets. All items uploaded to figshare are citable, shareable and discoverable.

Sharing and access

All publicly available research outputs are stored under Creative Commons Licenses. By default, figures, media, posters, papers, and filesets are available under a CC-BY license, datasets are available under CC0, and software/code is available under the MIT license. Learn more about sharing your research on figshare.

Archiving and preservation

figshare notes that items will be retained for the lifetime of the repository and that its sustainability model “includes the continued hosting and persistence of all public research outputs.” Research outputs are stored directly in Amazon Web Service’s S3 buckets. Data files and metadata are backed up nightly and replicated into multiple copies in the online system. Learn more about figshare’s preservation policies.

OSTP mandate

The OSTP mandate requires all federal funding agencies with over $100 million in R&D funds to make greater efforts to make grant-funded research outputs more accessible. This will likely mean that data must be publicly accessible and have an assigned DOI (though you’ll need to check with your funding agency for the exact requirements). All items uploaded to figshare are minted a DataCite DOI, so as long as your data is set to public it is a good candidate for complying with the mandate.

Visit figshare.

Have additional questions or concerns about where you should archive your data? Contact us.

Data Archiving Platforms: Dryad

by Brianna Marshall, Digital Curation Coordinator

This is part two of a three-part series where I explore platforms for archiving and sharing your data. Read the first post in the series, focused on UW’s institutional repository, MINDS@UW.

To help you better understand your options, here are the areas I address for each platform:

  • Background information on who can use it and what type of content is appropriate.
  • Options for sharing and access
  • Archiving and preservation benefits the platform offers
  • Whether the platform complies with the forthcoming OSTP mandate

Dryad

About

Dryad is a repository appropriate for data that accompanies published articles in the sciences or medicine. Many journals partner with Dryad to provide submission integration, which makes linking the data between Dryad and the journal easy for you. Pricing varies depending on the journal you are publishing in; some journals cover the data publishing charge (DPC) while others do not. Read more about Dryad’s pricing model or browse the journals with sponsored DPCs.

Sharing and access

Data uploaded to Dryad are made available for reuse under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license. There are no format restrictions to what you upload, though you are encouraged to use community standards if possible. Your data will be given a DOI, enabling you to get credit for sharing.

Archiving and preservation

According to the Dryad website, “Data packages in Dryad are replicated across multiple systems to support failover, improve access times, allow recovery from disk failures, and preserve bit integrity. The data packages are discoverable and backed up for long-term preservation within the DataONE network.”

OSTP mandate

The OSTP mandate requires all federal funding agencies with over $100 million in R&D funds to make greater efforts to make grant-funded research outputs more accessible. This will likely mean that data must be publicly accessible and have an assigned DOI (though you’ll need to check with your funding agency for the exact requirements). As long as the data you need to share is associated with a published article, Dryad is a good candidate for OSTP-compliant data: it mints DOIs and makes data openly available under a CC0 license.

Visit Dryad.

Have additional questions or concerns about where you should archive your data? Contact us.

Data Archiving Platforms: MINDS@UW

by Brianna Marshall, Digital Curation Coordinator

This is part one of a three-part series where I explore platforms for archiving and sharing your data. To help you better understand your options, here are the areas I will address for each platform:

  • Background information on who can use it and what type of content is appropriate
  • Options for sharing and access
  • Archiving and preservation benefits the platform offers
  • Compliance with the forthcoming OSTP mandate

MINDS@UW

About

MINDS@UW is the University of Wisconsin’s institutional repository, intended to capture, archive, and provide access to scholarship originating from campus researchers of any discipline. It is supported by the UW Libraries and free for all UW-affiliated researchers to use. While a wide variety of file formats are supported, this platform is best suited to handling text-based formats.

Sharing and access

Items in the repository are given a permanent URL that can be used to share the item; however, DOIs are not minted at this time. Items can be made open access (accessed free of charge by anyone, anywhere, at any time) or they can be embargoed (no access is provided until a certain time, up to a few years, has passed). Embargoed items are still discoverable since the metadata is indexed in the repository but the content will not be visible.

Archiving and preservation

The Libraries are committed to long-term preservation of all MINDS@UW items. In addition to the current backup practices in place, the Libraries are collaborating with the UW-Madison Office of the CIO to design and pilot a campus-scaled digital preservation infrastructure. This service, and the libraries’ own preservation repositories, will eventually be aligned with the Digital Preservation Network (DPN).

OSTP mandate

The OSTP mandate requires all federal funding agencies with over $100 million in R&D funds to make greater efforts to make grant-funded research outputs more accessible. This will likely mean that data must be publicly accessible and have an assigned DOI (though you’ll need to check with your funding agency for the exact requirements). Because MINDS@UW cannot provide a DOI at this time, it is not a suitable place for funder data.

The UW Libraries are always looking to improve this platform to better fit the needs of researchers. If you have a question, comment, or suggestion related to MINDS@UW, please contact repository manager Brianna Marshall.

Visit MINDS@UW.

Have additional questions or concerns about where you should archive your data? Contact us.

Databib and re3data.org to Merge Registry Services

In what they believe will reduce duplication of their registry services, research data repository search tool Databib (datbib.org) and the repository indexing service re3data.org will merge into one project by the end of 2015. The new entity will by manged by the not-for-profit, data set registration service, DataCite (datacite.org). According to the re3data.org site, “the aim of this merger is to reduce duplication of effort and to better serve the research community with a single, sustainable registry of research data repositories that incorporates the best features of both projects.” It is expected that the merged registry will become an imprint of DataCite by the end of 2015 and be included in its regular suite of services. See http://www.re3data.org/2014/03/datacite-re3data-org-databib-collaboration/ for more information on this merger.

Scientific Data Lost to Poor Archiving

A recent article from Library Journal highlights a critical problem in research data management:

“Hundreds of new pieces of scientific research are published every month, in fields from physics to biology. While the studies themselves are assiduously archived by publishers, the underlying data researchers analyze to come to their published conclusions can be another story. A recent study in the journal Current Biology found that the data that forms the backbone of those studies becomes less and less accessible to researchers over the years. That lack of archiving, says University of British Columbia zoologist Tim Vines, represents a missed opportunity for the scientific community as a whole.”

The article referenced is The Availability of Research Data Declines Rapidly with Article Age.