HIPAA: What Does It Mean for Medical Research Data?

Written by Jarrod Irwin

Researchers across disciplines care about the security and privacy of their data–especially those with data containing personally identifiable information, as even limited combinations of certain data points can lead to the identification of a subject. Researchers in the health sciences have an especially strong need to protect it. Patient health data has special legal restrictions on its use and handling.

Here’s a quick look at the most important U.S. law affecting patient health data, as well as some best practices for preserving data privacy when working with laboratory tests and other types of medical research data.

(more…)

Documenting DH: The Ex Libris Project

Written by Heather Wacha

Documenting DH is a project from the Digital Humanities Research Network (DHRN).  It consists of a series of audio interviews with various humanities scholars and students around the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Each interviewee is given a chance to talk about how they view data, work with data, manage data, or teach data to others.  Most recently, we interviewed members of the Ex Libris Project – Kyle Neill, Matthew Mickelson, and Morgan Pabst, three recent graduates from the University of Wisconsin’s iSchool.  Their perspective on digital humanities has been shaped by their willingness to pursue the nascent idea of “let’s do-a-digital-humanities-project” through to completion, and shape it into a series of short videos, which feature the people and stories behind three rare books held at Memorial Library’s Special Collections.

(more…)

Documenting DH: Martin Foys

Written by Heather Wacha

Documenting DH is a project from the Digital Humanities Research Network (DHRN).  It consists of a series of audio interviews with various humanities scholars and students around the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Each interviewee is given a chance to talk about how they view data, work with data, manage data, or teach data to others.  Most recently, we interviewed Martin Foys, Professor in the English Department, who discusses digital humanities with a depth of understanding that only comes from experience, including the incumbent successes and challenges of multiple and varied projects.  He still gets excited about humanist data and has reason to since he just released his most recent project, Digital Mappa (DM). You can learn more about DM at digitalmappa.org.

(more…)

Data In, Data Out: ICPSR is All About Data!

Information from the Social Science Computing Cooperative

Room: 3218 Sewell Social Sciences Building
Date: 4/16
Time: 12:00 – 1:30
There is no fee for this class. But registration is required .

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) is a data archive of which the University of Wisconsin is a member. Most people know ICPSR for its Summer Program classes or because they used data from the catalog for a long-ago research project. ICPSR is those things, and much more! Join us to find out about the kinds of data held, how to access or deposit data, and how ICPSR can help in meeting federal data-sharing requirements as well as with teaching/training. This informal presentation will include a look at ICPSR’s offerings and some tips for searching the catalog with plenty of freedom for individual exploration. You may even be able to snag a new lunch bag, flashing ice cube, or, at the very least, an ICPSR pen (oh, and some brochures and fliers too, of course).

Instructor: Lynette Hoelter

Lynette Hoelter is an assistant research scientist at ICPSR and a research affiliate of the Population Studies Center at the University of Michigan. At ICPSR, she is involved in projects related to quantitative reasoning and statistical literacy, especially within the undergraduate social science curriculum. Lynette is also Principal Investigator of a project to preserve and disseminate data about Gates Millennium Scholar awardees and finalists for use by researchers, policy makers, and administrators. Trained as a sociologist, her research interests include the study of family and relationship processes and best practices for teaching and learning quantitative skills. She has also taught for the departments of sociology and urban and regional planning, the survey methodology program, and ICPSR at the University of Michigan.

Link Roundup April 2018

light bulb

In this series, members of the RDS team share links to research data related stories, resources, and news that caught their eye each month. Feel free to share your favorite stories with us on Twitter @UWMadRschSvcs!

Allan Barclay

Stephen Hawking’s PhD thesis is openly available online via the University of Cambridge’s repository! You can also read more about it on the University of Cambridge’s research site.

Cameron Cook

DoIT posted some tips last month on how to keep your data safer when traveling.

If you’re interested in using the Open Science Framework to share your data, Courtney K. Soderberg wrote a handy step-by-step guide!

Throwing back to an oldie but a goodie with this one, heard through Amanda Whitmire this month, “Nine simple ways to make it easier to (re)use your data“.

Documenting DH: Eric Hoyt

Written by Heather Wacha

Documenting DH is a project from the Digital Humanities Research Network (DHRN).  It consists of a series of audio interviews with various humanities scholars and students around the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Each interviewee is given a chance to talk about how they view data, work with data, manage data, or teach data to others.  Most recently, we interviewed Eric Hoyt, Associate Professor in Media and Cultural Studies who talked about his extensive participation in digital humanities that started while he was a doctoral student and continues at the University of  Wisconsin, Madison – from the Digital Media Library to his most recent project, PodcastRE, supported by NEH and UW2020 grants.

(more…)

Open Science Grid (OSG) User School 2018

Announcement from Christina Koch + OSG

ANNOUNCING THE OPEN SCIENCE GRID USER SCHOOL 2018!

If you could access hundreds or even thousands of computers for your scholarly work, what could you do? How could it transform your work? What discoveries might you make?

We are seeking applicants for the Open Science Grid (OSG) User School 2018, which takes place July 9-13 at the beautiful University of Wisconsin in Madison. Participants will learn to use high throughput computing (HTC) to harness vast amounts of computing power for research, applicable to nearly any field of study (e.g., physics, chemistry, engineering, life sciences, earth sciences, agricultural and animal sciences, economics, social sciences, medicine, and more).

For more background:
https://research.cs.wisc.edu/htcondor/htc.html
https://www.opensciencegrid.org/news/research-highlights-list/

Using lectures, discussions, roleplays, and lots of hands-on work with OSG experts in HTC, participants will learn how HTC systems work, how to run and manage many jobs and huge datasets, how to implement a realistic scientific computing workflow, and where to turn for help and more info.

Worried about costs? We pay all basic travel, hotel, and food costs for applicants who are selected to attend. This is a valuable offer! Ideal candidates are graduate students whose research involves or could involve large-scale computing – work that cannot be done on one laptop or a handful of computers. Also, we accept some post-doctoral students, faculty, staff, and advanced undergraduates, so make a strong case for yourself regardless of your current role!

IMPORTANT DATES
Application Period (OPEN NOW): 15 March – 20 April 2018
OSG User School: 9-13 July 2018

MORE INFORMATION AND APPLICATIONS
Web: https://www.opensciencegrid.org/UserSchool
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OSGUserSchool
Twitter: https://twitter.com/OSGUserSchool